Bumblebees on Pulmonaria

Bumblebees on Pulmonaria

Bumblebees love Pulmonaria. Copious blossoms and also in flower at a time of year when the forage is quite limited. I’ve got loads of them in the garden (too many in fact) but won’t start remodelling the garden until my furry flying friends have something else to feed/gather from.

Spring is springing

Spring is springing

The beautiful (and suprisingly tough) Bletilla Striata.  A terrestrial orchid native to Asia that with a bit of care, attention and careful location can grow suprisingly well in the UK.  These are second season for me and once they’ve spread I’ll look for a nice woody sheltered glade to plant them.

Farmer Brown’s Garden

So I’ve started a Youtube channel.  It’s called Farmer Brown’s Garden and will offer a weekly clip on what to do in the garden, various tips and other stuff.  My first rough and ready foray is available below.  Feel free to subscribe and pass on any comments ideas or tips you may have

Natural gardening or unkempt garden?

Natural gardening or unkempt garden?

 

 

 

 

lawn and wildflowersIt’s vogue (and rightly so) to provide for the wildlife that treats our gardens as home and haven.  This should include the plants and flowers that the wildlife depends on for survival.  Setting aside chunks of your garden to go wild is not so easy as invasive plants like blackberry and hawthorn can quickly overcome those wildflower patches.  The boundary between manicured garden and untended (apparently) garden is also a challenging one.  Blocks of wild look out of place.   They also look like you haven’t “got around” to that bit yet.  An observation I would make is that keeping your wild garden at the edges helps with the overall look.  It helps even more if your garden backdrop is open fields of hedgerows.  That way the wildness just seems to seep in and blend the boundary between the wild and the managed.  In my garden I have large banks of cow parsley at the moment that sit above the lawn.  There is a slight dip at the edge of the lawn (for drainage) that sets the boundary more sharply.  So the cow parsley (and other flowers) look like a natural border as opposed to a wild patch.  
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